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In California, doctors face greater scrutiny while patients face diminished choice. Will it work? (Photo: Halfpoint/Shutterstock)

California Health Care Professional Disaster Response Act

Addresses the needs of emergency physicians in times of national or state disasters

By Chris Micheli, August 21, 2022 10:33 am

California has a number of formal acts in statute. Business and Professions Code Division 2, Chapter 1.6 provides the Health Care Professional Disaster Response Act, which is contained in Sections 920 to 922. Chapter 1.6 was added in 2002 by Chapter 1085. Section 920 names the Act.

Section 921 makes two legislative findings and declarations, including that, in times of national or state disasters, a shortage of qualified health care practitioners may exist in areas throughout the state where they are desperately required to respond to public health emergencies. Therefore, it is the intent of the Legislature to address these matters through the provisions of the Health Care Professional Disaster Response Act.

Section 922 provides that a physician and surgeon who satisfies the requirements of existing law, but whose license has been expired for less than five years, may be licensed under this chapter. In order to be licensed, a physician and surgeon must complete an application, on a form prescribed by the Medical Board of California, and submit it to the board, along with the specified documents. In addition, an applicant is not required to pay any licensing, delinquency, or penalty fees for the issuance of a license under this chapter.

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7 thoughts on “California Health Care Professional Disaster Response Act

  1. California’s health care profession is its own disaster. LOL.

    I’ve had six appointments with MDs at esteemed facilities over the past six years, and all of them resulted in false information in my medical history, improper treatment, and/or mismanaged billing disasters.

  2. Wait, what? I don’t want someone with an expired license, who hasn’t had continuing education, who hasn’t practiced in years and in fact maybe they let their license lapse due to medical board interventions for practice concerns. The article doesn’t give me enough information, it just scares me.

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