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Rep. Doris Matsui (D-CA)

California Reps. Win Without Campaigning?

Sacramento area Reps. Matsui, Bera, won with huge margins and little to no campaigning

By Katy Grimes, November 4, 2020 3:31 pm

With Tuesday’s election behind us, the analyses across the country from local to national races are heating up. Election fraud charges are rearing up in several states, which will play out in the courts.

California is an interesting animal, and one the rest of the country should be wary of emulating.  In 2018, ballot harvesting had a major impact on the midterm elections in California, when seven Republican candidates were leading on election night, but lost weeks later because of the delay in counting mail ballots – many of which were harvested.

Flash forward to 2020, and we see most of those same ballot-harvested congressional seats retained by Democrats.

But we also have numerous members of California’s congressional delegation winning with huge margins, while doing little to no actual campaigning.

I live in the 6th Congressional District, home to Rep. Doris Matsui (D-CA), a seat she has held since 2005 when her husband Robert Matsui, who was the Congressman for the district, passed away. Doris announced her candidacy for his congressional seat the day after his funeral, easily won election and hasn’t really campaigned since. In fact, most of her constituents rarely see her in Sacramento, and it is common knowledge she lives in Washington D.C. Even Wikipedia says, “The Matsuis moved to Washington, D.C. shortly thereafter (Robert’s 1979 election), where they raised their son.”

Her opponent this election, Chris Bish, a local businesswoman, discovered that Doris Matsui didn’t actually live in the district, but lived in Chevy Chase, MD, and Washington D.C.

Bish filed a lawsuit stating:

“Doris Matsui moved from California in 1979 to 5800 Kennedy Dr. Chevy Chase, Maryland, where she continuously resided until April of 2020 when she married Roger W. Sant and moved to Washington D.C.”

“She has established her residency/ domicile in the State of Maryland and has reaffirmed that residency several times over the years…”

“Doris Matsui claimed a tax exemption based on a claim that her residence in Chevy Chase Maryland was her primary residence for the years 2000 to 2009. When a Congressional ethics committee investigation was launched in 2008, she claimed it was a mistake and repaid the $2,800.00 in taxes to the State of Maryland. She once again claimed the primary residence exemption for the year 2010. Doris Matsui has never claimed a tax exemption for the 4230 Warren Ave. address in Sacramento, California, which she inherited and in fact has never lived there despite her use of that address to attempt to qualify for Congressional office. 6. In 2017, Doris Matsui signed a statement under oath that the 5800 Kennedy Dr. Chevy Chase, Maryland, was her primary residence for the purpose of obtaining a mortgage loan. At the time she signed the statement under oath she was a member of Congress from California. If her statement to Citi Bank under oath was true and correct then she was not qualified to be a candidate for the 2018 election to Congress from California. Further, she is disqualified from this election pursuant to California Election Code.”

According to candidate Bish, Staff Counsel, office of legal Affairs for the California Secretary of State referred this case to the election fraud unit. (lawsuit included below)

But is it too late? Did Matsui even care? Apparently Matsui was worried enough to buy for cash, a $1.795 million home in Sacramento’s Land Park neighborhood in August 2020. We will follow Bish’s legal challenge to Matsui – it’s been a well-known secret that Matsui hasn’t really lived in Sacramento for decades.

The internal polling for the Matsui campaign must have shown that Bish was no threat, so Doris Matsui did not even campaign. And here is why:

6th District

  • Doris Matsui (D) 107,316    75.9%
  • Chris Bish (R)       34,150    24.1%

The Matsui name is as golden in her district as Nancy Pelosi’s is in hers.

As for Rep. Ami Bera (D-CA), he was also MIA during the campaign. Most constituents the Globe talked to said they didn’t hear any radio ads, or see mailers, but his opponent Buzz Patterson was all over the 7th District, on radio and television. Although Patterson achieved significantly more votes than Bish did, it did not seem to matter in this race either:

7th District

  • Ami Bera (D)            116,437 61%
  • Buzz Patterson (R)  74,436 39%

 

Look at the wide margins in all of these California races – challengers didn’t even come close to the incumbents:

2nd District

  • Jared Huffman (D)      202,135  78%
  • Dale K. Mensing (R)    56,204  22%

3rd District

  • John Garamendi (D)    123,527  58%
  • Tamika Hamilton (R)  89,220    42%

12th District

  • Shahid Buttar (D)  59,745     20.8%
  • Nancy Pelosi (D)    227,989   79.2%

13th District

  • Barbara Lee (D)          160,901    91.0%
  • Nikka Piterman (R)    15,882.       9.0%

14th District

  • Jackie Speier (D)  197,031   80.5%
  • Ran S. Petel (R)      47,635   19.5%

15th District

  • Eric Swalwell (D)      119,572   72.8%
  • Alison Hayden (R)     44,752   27.2%

16th District

  • Jim Costa (D)                   92,921   60.5%
  • Kevin Cookingham (R)  60,695   39.5%

17th District

  • Ro Khanna (D)        125,258   74.1%
  • Ritesh Tandon (R)  43,775     25.9%

19th District

  • Zoe Lofgren (D)                     135,927    74.1%
  • Justin James Aguilera (R)    47,511      25.9%

20th District

  • Jimmy Panetta (D)  186,617    78.2%
  • Jeff Gorman (R)         52,132    21.8%

24th District

  • Salud Carbajal (D)  169,061 62%
  • Andy Caldwell (R)  104,016 38%

28th District

  • Adam B. Schiff (D)  194,417  74%
  • Eric Early (R)            68,110  26%

30th District

  • Brad Sherman (D)  190,475   70.7%
  • Mark S. Reed (R)    79,057     29.3%

40th District

  • Lucille Royball-Allard (D) 90,612  72.8%
  • C Antonio Delgado (R) 33,806  27.2%

41st District

  • Mark Takano (D)  67,535  64.1%
  • Aja Smith (R) 37,777  35.9%

43rd District

  • Maxine Waters (D) 145,866   72.5%
  • Joe Collins (R)  55,224   27.5%

51st District

  • Juan Vargas (D)      70.1%  (108,986)
  • Juan Hidalgo (R)   29.9%. (46,581)

52nd District

  • Scott Peters (D)      63.3%  (200,919)
  • Jim DeBello (R)   36.7% (116,606)

This is California under Democrat Supermajority rule. It’s not healthy.

Doris Matsui lawsuit (Bish)
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16 thoughts on “California Reps. Win Without Campaigning?

  1. My wife usually gets a note in the USPS mail saying at least he’s running this time I never saw anything that said he was even running. Now I see his name on a corner, on a sign. But Patterson’s sign has been up for much longer. Same with Bish.
    Richard

    1. Glad to see this. I was noticing the same thing this morning, that the typical spread looked like Venezuela (or similar) results. You know, 85% to 15% win for some of these invisible people who seem dodgy at best and apparently don’t lift a finger to campaign? Really? Super-fishy. Even I knew who some of their Repub opponents were without living in the district, so they had obviously made themselves known. Some had run before and were good candidates.
      Made me think that a clean election would have resulted in a Repub blowout in other races (and propositions) instead of these squeakers we are now seeing.

  2. Why bother campaigning when voter fraud can elect (almost) a drooling imbecile in the pay of both the Russians and the Chinese?

    1. I am curious to know your opinion of President Trump’s investments in Russia and China? What did you think of his taking V Putin’s word over the CIA’s intelligence on the Russian Internet troll farms and the in absentia indictments of top Russian officials in charge of the campaign? Do you think it’s a good idea to let North Korea continue their nuclear weapons program? (They just tested and paraded their latest ICBM last week.) Is it a good idea to keep subsidizing farms, both family owned and corporate, that are failing because of the inclement climate? Did you actually see drool coming Joe Biden’s mouth or are you making fun of the years it took to overcome a stutter he ha since childhood? Just curious.

    1. It was very disappointing for me to see. I also felt that the margins were just too high. Especially saddened to see a great candidate such as Buzz Patterson not get the chance to make any changes here. Biden got 73% of the vote in my county alone. Absolutely ridiculous. People would probably still vote Newsom back into office today if they could. Seriously???!!

      1. I know, Buzz Patterson! Exactly.
        The former corrupt-lite mayor of my corrupt-lite town used to routinely win by 86%. What?! A unheard number in a normal election. A lot of it was because there was such low voter turnout. The town “fathers” rigged it to be that way by separating the local elections from bigger elections; meanwhile making sure that their allies, city and county and school district employees and their families, and the other usual beneficiaries voted. Easier to win by 86% when the total voter turnout is 7% of registered voters! But in California, in this strange year where many suffered horribly from economic and other matters, and much skullduggery was revealed, low voter turnout was not the problem, unless by “turnout” what one really means is turnout for fraud efforts.

        One silver lining may be, at least, that more people are understanding now what voter fraud and lack of election integrity means and is all about. It has become PERSONAL this year. Good.

  3. Katie, I hear you. Very disturbing. I think it’s because most people are happy with the “status Quo”. During this “pandemic” I’ve been walking around the neighborhoods (can’t go to the gym!), and have been talking with folks (at a distance, of course!). I’m in Ro Khanna’s distict FYI. Most people seem to think things are fine as far as they’re concerned. Free stuff, no onerous taxes, “for the children”(!), no obvious impact on their lives of the policies these far-leftists espouse. Even if they’re aware of it. Mostly “low information voters” (as Rush used to say). They get their info from MSM sources. They just “rubber stamp” incumbents. They see no good reason to not.

  4. “The Matsui name is as golden in her district as Nancy Pelosi’s is in hers.” I suppose they retain their seats without having to spend a great deal of money because the vast majority of their constituents are pleased with the job they’re doing. I don’t recall coming unglued when Pete Wilson or Kevin McCarthy or Arnold Schwarzenegger won their races, though I was thoroughly against their policies. And I certainly didn’t accuse the Republican Party of voter fraud or even “skullduggery”. In a state of some 20 million registered voters who do their duty with a single ballot, it would be a pretty tough task to bring about the margins that would change outcomes. It would be voter fraud on an Olympian level and while I admire the enthusiasm of the Democratic Party, I don’t think they have either the will or the recourse to crank out that much malfeasance. I know, it’s the tech billionaires that are footing the bill. They’re too busy ginning up the economy.
    I would like to add that according to the conservative Heritage Foundation database that monitors cases of verified voter fraud, they (not any actual governing body) have found 1,265 nationwide thus far in the 2020 election. It’s safe to say there are more, maybe even double that! – pending the revelation of what actually occurred in each case. You do the math. (I would also point out that the most significant cases of actual voter fraud, to wit, the South Carolina district race, 2018, which involved Republican campaign officials destroying the ballots they collected from unsuspecting voters.) Republicans have moved heaven and highwater to make voting (a Constitutional right without restriction other than citizenship and no felony convictions) more difficult – such as signature match.ing If that was the case in California, I would not have been allowed to vote in over 50 years of doing so, my signature is such chicken scratch…
    I appreciate and understand the angst over representation. I live in a small rural community where Trump signs are the gang colors. I hear the ranchers’ here talk of having no representation in Sacramento (though Doug LaMalfa, a really nice guy, won his race by 55% points). When I ask respectfully what it is they want done on their behalf, they have difficulty articulating much beyond lowering taxes, eradicating wolves (all three of them), recalling Newsom because of his handling of the COVID crisis. I disagree about the wolves – but when I ask what they think a Republican governor would do about COVID, there’s one simple answer – keep business open, let the disease do its work (which is to make people seriously ill or die). I’m pretty sure that is unpopular among people who don’t live in rural areas where there is lots of space and stretches of time without much human contact.
    Sorry to go on – there are some very thoughtful comments here along with some unhinged, crazy stuff. And there’s a little too much of that these days, right? I await considered thoughts.

  5. By the way, the voter fraud case that resulted in convictions was in North Carolina, not South – my Carolingian aunt would be mortified.

  6. California is the worst of the worst. Fraud in this state has been going unchecked for years. It’s time the republicans to stand up and make some noise.
    There were thousands of people at the rallies for the Republicans. I did not see one rally on behalf of the Democrats but they won all the races? I think not.
    If you want to talk about illegitimate seat holders. Our Governor is a prime example. He was behind and then all of a sudden declares the winner.
    This BS needs to stop.

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