Home>Articles>Gov. Newsom: COVID-19 Focus On Central Valley As State Shows Improvement

Governor Gavin Newsom at a press conference on August 3, 2020. (Photo: Youtube)

Gov. Newsom: COVID-19 Focus On Central Valley As State Shows Improvement

New COVID positivity rates fall across California

By Evan Symon, August 3, 2020 4:51 pm

On Monday, Governor Gavin Newsom announced new COVID-19 cases and positivity rates were down in all areas of California except for the Central Valley, which is due to receive more money and support from the government this week.

In addition to the $52 million in funding and state strike teams sent last week, Governor Newsom announced an additional $6.5 million in donations being sent to the Central Valley for essentials for vulnerable people.

Protocols first enacted in formerly hard-hit Imperial County such as sending patients to hospitals outside the county and increasing protective measures will be applied to the eight counties of the Central Valley to help lessen the spread and reduce the number of new cases.

Positivity rates in Imperial County were as high as 30% in June and early July, with rates now around 11.2% following the intervention of strike teams.

“The Central Valley is now California’s biggest area of concern,” noted Governor Newsom during Monday’s press conference.

However, Governor Newsom also announced a spate of good news during the press conference. The number of daily new cases in California has fallen to a weekly average of 7,764, an huge 21% drop from the 9,800 average a week before. New COVID-19 patients have also gone down by 10%.

“That’s some good news,” said the Governor of the statewide declinations.

He also announced that positivity rates fell from 7.5% to a flat 7%, coming closer to the 5% and under rate over two weeks that the World Health Organization (WHO) has given as the stay-at-home order threshold.

“They still have a long way to go, and it’s only a week, but it’s showing you that California is doing everything it can to get back on track and reopen,” stated Luke Pulaski, an economist studying the effects of COVID-19 on the economy, to the Globe. “California learned its lesson on reopening early and is being cautious. Compare it to Southern states or even Washington state where cases are still on the rise. If they keep up, California can come back quicker than most. And with the economy the way it is, it can’t come soon enough.”

Governor Newsom remained cautious as well, warning that new COVID-19 cases have only gone down for a week.

“One week does not make the kind of trend that generates headlines,” added Newsom. “We won’t feel confident for a few weeks. This virus is not going away. Its not going to take Labor Day weekend off Halloween off or the holidays off. Until we have a vaccine we are going to be living with this virus.”

As of Monday, 514,901 cases of COVID-19 have been reported in California, with 9,388 deaths being reported since March.

Evan Symon
Spread the news:
RELATED ARTICLES
Filter by
Post Page
Highlight Articles National Governor Legislature Local
Sort by

Bill Requiring Prisons To House Transgender Inmates Based On Gender Identity Signed By Gov

SB 132 will also prohibit prison staff from calling prisoners by an unwanted gender pronoun
September 28, 2020 2:46 pm

18

Several Mental Health Reforming Bills Signed By Gov. Newsom

California counties, health insurance companies to expand services, further fund mental health, addiction
September 26, 2020 8:03 am

18

Gov. Newsom Signs Bill Regulating Food Delivery Apps

Restaurants will need to give permission to delivery companies for deliveries
September 26, 2020 7:57 am

18

4 thoughts on “Gov. Newsom: COVID-19 Focus On Central Valley As State Shows Improvement

  1. What happened to the fifteen days in March that would flatten the curve? Five months later with the goal posts moved every week.

  2. Comrades

    In Red Eastern Europe state stores had variable product, by day, creating frustrating shortages of food stocks.

    River bridges were open/closed unpredictability creating uncertainty on when/ how to get to work.

    Stress, tension, confusion, chaos, I give up population attitudes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *