Home>Articles>$1B Annual Public School Arts/Music Funding Proposition On Nov. 2022 Ballot

Boy looks under voting booth at Ventura Polling Station for California primary Ventura County, California, Ventura County, CA, Jun. 7, 2016. (Photo: Joseph Sohm/Shutterstock)

$1B Annual Public School Arts/Music Funding Proposition On Nov. 2022 Ballot

Prop 28 has much support, some opposition going into final months before election

By Evan Symon, July 7, 2022 2:30 am

California Secretary of State Shirley Weber confirmed on Wednesday that there will only be 7 statewide propositions on the November, the fewest since 2014, including the first school arts funding proposition, to reach a statewide ballot in California.

According to the petition summary of Proposition 28, whose number was assigned by Weber last week, the proposition would increase arts and music funding for public schools. 1% of all state funding for public schools would annually be allocated to music and arts educations. All K-12 public schools, including charter schools, would be covered under the proposition, with a greater portion of the funds going to economically disadvantaged students. Schools with 500 or more students would have to spend at least 80% of funding on teachers, with the rest  on training and supplies. The Legislative Analyst’s Office estimates that this will cost around $800 million to $1 billion a year. Prop 28 would not raise taxes, but would draw from the funds allotted for schools.

Prop 28 was started by the group Californians for Arts and Music Education in Public Schools, who helped get the support needed to place it on the ballot following it being first proposed in November of last year. According to supporters, public schools in California are behind on arts and music as compared to other states. 96% of middle schools and 72% of high schools in California are estimated to be behind in teaching the subjects to students.

Proponents have noted that arts and music educations would help open doors for many students, and would help prepare them for up-and-coming careers in the arts and technology, especially in computer related careers such as design and coding, as well help bridge the arts gap between many public schools.

Proposition 28 support, opposition

“Only 1 in 5 public schools in California has a dedicated teacher for traditional arts programs like music, dance, theater and art, or newer forms of creative expression like computer graphics, animation, coding, costume design and filmmaking,” said former Los Angeles Unified School District Superintendent Austin Beutner and former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan in a joint statement on the proposition. “This initiative is timely as our country seeks to create a more just and equitable future for all children. A boost in arts and music education will help ensure the future workforce in media and technology properly reflect the diversity of the children in our public schools.”

While support for the proposition is high, largely due to it not raising taxes and helping students prepare for careers centered around Californian industries, some detractors have noted that, under Prop 28, the funding level would remain high even if the number of Californian students would dip below, perhaps putting a larger burden and overspending on arts and music in the future.

“While arts is important, music less so, students really need to focus on areas that help build them up and prepare them for the real world,” explained Lydia Hill, a teacher from Southern California who intends to lead local opposition to the proposition later this year. “Only a certain percentage of students go into art , even less so in music. Things like math and science and history, that has broader and more solidified applications for students and can help make their minds up on what they want to do in life.”

“Education policy in California really needs to change. Teachers unions need less power. Common core needs to go. And we need to stop reallocating spending so willy-nilly. If we vote no on this, we’ll at least keep in tact part of the system that still works and can go from there to correct others.”

Proposition 28 is one of 7 statewide proposition to be on the November ballot in 2022.

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Evan Symon
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9 thoughts on “$1B Annual Public School Arts/Music Funding Proposition On Nov. 2022 Ballot

  1. Funding for more liberal arts programs for students who can not speak, write or spell the Kings English!
    YAWN: Another pay back to CTA for all the help in the precincts that defeated the recall.
    add; “with your money”

  2. Why were these funds CUT back in the day, anyways???
    California has lagged “funding” for music, theater and other programs for DECADES now….
    And NOW it’s a priority, with all of the other SCREW-UPS that the Democrats that have had a hammerlock on California politics for a similar amount of time???
    These people are delusional….and their timing STINKS…. or wait, they’ll wrap this one up with a pretty advertising campaign this Fall to make everyone feel good, and then misappropriate the funds from this program, just as they did for the water management bonds that they got passed several years ago now….

    DEMOCRATS are simply INCAPABLE of managing a budget or money because they are EMOTION-DRIVEN, DEVOID of logic or organizational skills and pander to constituents, but INEVITABLY end up NOT delivering on what they promise…..
    And yet people vote for them…. low-information voters that are swayed by the emtional tug of their television advertising campaigns and mailers, evidently….

  3. “Education policy in California really needs to change. Teachers unions need less power. Common core needs to go. And we need to stop reallocating spending so willy-nilly. If we vote no on this, we’ll at least keep in tact part of the system that still works and can go from there to correct others.”

    ^^^ THIS!!!!

    ESPECIALLY this : “Teachers unions need less power.”

  4. When I see “equity” in a proposal, it sends up a huge red flag! Music is really important in schools, and I’m all for it, but I’m wondering where all these funds will really go. From what I’m reading, I doubt it will go to where they are saying it will go. Not much different than anything else in CA.

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