Home>Articles>What Does a Bill Propose to Do to a Law?

The Legislative Bill Room, California State Capitol. (Photo: ca.gov)

What Does a Bill Propose to Do to a Law?

There are three types of actions that a bill can take

By Chris Micheli, March 11, 2022 7:52 am

Bills in the California Legislature can do one of three things or a combination of those three: Add a statute; amend a statute; or, repeal a statute.

Bills can be found at the following website: https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/

This website is maintained by the Office of Legislative Counsel, which also drafts all bills and amendments. Legislative Counsel also helps readers of bills by using different font colors to assist in seeing how a bill proposes to change state statutes. Let’s review the three things a bill can do and how a reader can see those three law changes on the above website:

Add a new statute:

When a bill is first introduced, the font color is black and regular. The bill clearly states that the bill would “add” a new section to an existing Code. The following is an example of adding a new statute:

SECTION 1.

Section 17070.37 is added to the Education Code, to read:

17070.37.

If cash proceeds from sources other than bonds are made available by the Legislature, those proceeds shall be allocated to projects on the “Applications Received Beyond Bond Authority List” described in Section 1859.95.1 of Title 2 of the California Code of Regulations that are reviewed by the department and approved by the State Allocation Board.

Amend an existing statute:

When a bill amends an existing statute (by adding new statutory language), the font color is blue and the letters are italicized. The bill clearly states that the bill would “amend” an existing section of an existing Code. The following is an example of amending an existing statute:

SECTION 1.

Section 19817 of the Business and Professions Code is amended to read:

19817.

The commission shall establish and appoint a Gaming Policy Advisory Committee of 10 members. The committee shall be composed of representatives of controlled gambling licensees and members of the general public in equal numbers. The executive director shall, from time to time, shall convene the committee at least once annually for the purpose of discussing matters of controlled gambling regulatory policy and any other relevant gambling-related issue. The recommendations concerning gambling policy made by the committee shall be presented to the commission, but shall be deemed advisory and not binding on the commission in the performance of its duties or functions. The committee may shall not advise the commission on Indian gaming.

Repeal an existing statute:

When a bill repeals an existing statute, the font color is red and the letters have strikethrough. The bill clearly states that the bill would “repeal” an existing section of an existing Code. The following is an example of repealing an existing statute:

SECTION 1.

Section 1672.3 of the Vehicle Code is repealed.

1672.3.

(a) The director shall determine the date when the department’s inventory of driver’s license and identification card forms, as that inventory exists in accordance with the law in effect on December 31, 1998, has been depleted.

(b)The director shall make written notification of the date determined under subdivision (a) to the following persons:

(1) The Secretary of State.

(2) The Chair of the Senate Committee on Transportation.

(3) The Chair of the Assembly Committee on Transportation.

(c) The written notice required under subdivision (b) shall state that it is being submitted in accordance with this section.

That is all there is to it. Again, there are three types of actions that a bill can take and they are easy to see on the website.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Spread the news:

 RELATED ARTICLES

One thought on “What Does a Bill Propose to Do to a Law?

  1. While bills can add a statute, amend a statute, or repeal a statute, the bureaucratic deep-state decides on how bills are administered?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.